End of the Month Links: September

Click, Click, Click… It’s what we like to do!

Here are 6 of one or half-dozen of another posts I have found around the web (or are sent to me) that I have found interesting, funny, insightful, or thoughtful:

William Wilberforce’s Relentless Battle to End Slavery

A reminder that “Sometimes carrying out a particular ministry that the Lord would have us to fulfill requires not just weeks or months of effort. Sometimes it demands many years or even several decades of unrelenting, determined endeavor.”

Excerpt: “With the renewed encouragement, strength and tenacity that God Himself provides, we can successfully fulfill even the longest-term tasks to which He calls us. William Wilberforce’s relentless efforts to bring an end to slavery in the British Empire are a sterling and instructive example of that.”

Decision Making & “I Have a Peace About It”

One of the most gnostic common sayings that the church gives about decision making is addressed and the correct way given.

Excerpt: “That process of making the decision usually goes something like this. I am facing a difficult issue in my life, requiring some wise decision-making. However, I approach the decision with a pre-existing bent towards my own comfort. Instead of an objective approach to the decision, I have a subjective bent towards getting my own way. I have some desire for God to weigh in on the decision. I may pray about it, look up a few verses, and ask a few friends, but I am hoping to discover some Christian key to unlock my wants. I likely run into counsel either from godly friends, leadership, or Scripture which hinders getting my way. I subsequently feel more drawn towards my decision. I find a few verses (which I do not rigorously study with a proper hermeneutic and help from church leadership) that, though taken out of context, seem to support what I already want. This fuels my existing idolatrous pursuit. I run across some friends and verses which assure me that God wants me to feel happy and joyful about what I do. Since it does not seem joyful to make the more difficult decision, I am further established in my own way. I run across some verses which discuss personal peace. I perceive a feeling of personal peace as I meditate on my pre-desired decision and the consequent ease it will bring in my life. Therefore, since I experience feelings of increasing pleasure, I conclude that I am at peace. Thus, since I presume that God wants me to be at peace, I conclude that my feeling of peace is God assuring me, “This is the decision you should make.” Finally, I declare, “I have a peace about making this decision. I have prayed about it. God is calling me to ____.” And I go through with the decision. But all is not well.”

Finding God’s Will for Your Life Is Easier than You Think

A “follow-up” from the previous article. Finding God’s will is actually super easy and does not rely on having a peace.

Excerpt: ” Why do so many believers get all stressed out about finding God’s will for their life? I believe it’s because most of us tend to overplay the importance of God’s specific will for our life, while underestimating the value of knowing and doing God’s universal will for all our lives. We often want to skip past the 90 percent (the Essentials) and jump straight to the 10 percent (the Specifics).”

Apologists, Catechists, Theologians: Wake Up!

A call to action to reclaim the heritage of intellect that somehow we have left on a shelf.

Excerpt: “Let me look just briefly at some of the chief reasons offered for walking away from Christianity. Many evidently felt that modern science somehow undermines the claims of the faith. One respondent said: “rational thought makes religion go out the window,” and another complained of the “lack of any sort of scientific evidence of a creator.” Well, I’m sure it would come as an enormous surprise to St. Paul, St. Augustine, St. John Chrysostom, St. Jerome, St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Robert Bellarmine, Blessed John Henry Newman, G.K. Chesterton, C.S. Lewis, and Joseph Ratzinger—all among the most brilliant people Western culture has produced—that religion and reason are somehow incompatible.”

Against Eternal Youth

Using characters in older films compared to recent films shows that our culture has not only bowed to the idol of youth but has forsaken the virtue of maturity.

Excerpt: “Future historians will have to sort out our plight—how a whole generation could forget to grow up, while still attempting to raise a younger generation and lead the most powerful nation in the world through times of war and terror. The skills of adulthood are not ones we know how to use. Being kittenish, or obscene, or adorably perplexed—we can do that. But gathering the gravity and confidence that signals full maturity is beyond our capabilities. It’s not youth that passed us by, but adulthood. ”

Office Kingdom

I feel like this is my job sometimes…. if only that was true.

 

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