End of the Month Links: June 2017

At least my TV loves me… right?

Here are 6 of one or half-dozen of another posts I have found around the web (or are sent to me) that I have found interesting, funny, insightful, or thoughtful:

How Objective Beauty Fuels a Culture

Dr. Reynolds makes the case that this a proper belief in the existence of objective beauty fuels a culture and voluntary love will die as we lose our belief in objective beauty. [the whole lecture is at the end of the article as a video]

Excerpt: “When we believe in objectivity, we are free from the beholders…. If subjectivity is the only reality when it comes to beauty, and a girl goes to school and everyone says, “You’re fat and unattractive,” and she picks up magazine after magazine, and there’s not one woman of color in it, not one woman with her body shape, not one woman her mother’s age, then beauty being “in the eye of the beholder” is not liberating; it is the ultimate tyranny because the only reality is what those guys in high school say in judgment about you…. The reality becomes, ultimately, what a few people tell us…”

Love Needs an Education

Greg of Stand to Reason offers thoughts on what true, biblical love is versus the kind of love that simply makes people feel good.

 

Once upon a Time: The Enduring Appeal of Fairy Tales

The fairy tale is alive and strong in the world today. This is a very good thing and should give us hope. Stories are what Christ used to preach Truth, and stories teach us much more that mere propositions do.

Excerpt: “We respond so powerfully to fairy tales, Tolkien says, precisely because they resonate with truth at a level much deeper than we realize: “The Gospels contain a fairystory, or a story of a larger kind which embraces all the essence of fairystories.” Here is what C. S. Lewis called “myth made fact”: as Tolkien puts it, “This story has entered History and the primary world….The Birth of Christ is the eucatastrophe of Man’s history. […] When we respond imaginatively to the happy ending of a fairy tale, we are, possibly without even realizing it, responding to the gospel, which has the same joy as that evoked in a fairy tale: “But,” Tolkien tells us, “this story is supreme; and it is true.” The happy ending of the fairy tale gives us, as Tolkien shows us, a foretaste of the Good News. For we are all Cinderella: the gospel is the story of the Prince who rescues us from the ashes and brings us to his wedding feast.”

7 Reasons Why the Medieval Sensibility Tends to Be More Biblically Grounded Than the Modern Aesthetic

Worldview matters, and the Aesthetics have been under attack from since the separation of Truth, Beauty, and the Just from it.

Excerpt: “As the Enlightenment progressed, education moved farther away from teaching the Liberal Arts (Trivium and Quadrivium). This change in emphasis skewed perspectives, ideologies, theology, culture, and the arts into new directions and trajectories that continue to inform how society thinks. In addition, the change in aesthetics from the medieval period to a modern sensibility reflects broader changes in how we view the cosmos and what we think about divine order..”

Children of the ‘80s Never Fear: Video Games Did Not Ruin Your Life

Some good news! and if this is true then the fear mongering of other things do not mean the end of the world.

Excerpt: “There is a particularly American tradition of becoming enthralled with new technologies of communication, identifying their promise of future prosperity and renewed community. It is matched by a related American tradition of freaking out about the same objects, which are also figured as threats to life as we know it”?

Changeover

Beware where we place our heart, we could love for the wrong reasons with consequences.

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